New "Recognize The Thieves" Scam Spreads Like An Epidemic On Social Media Stealing Your Credentials

 

Recognize the Thieves Scam: How It Works

The social media world helps online communities join forces efficiently every time there is a social cause involved. When was the last time you've seen a friend asking for a recommendation or help or social media? Probably very recently.

However, it only takes one compromised Facebook account for scammers to use and attract in their trap hundreds of passwords and login credentials. And today it could be YOURS. Be very careful about the Recognize the Thieves Scam spreading like an epidemic this week on social media. How does it work?

Watch the video below to see the scam exposed:

Recognize The Thieves Scam Video

Imagine this: you receive a message on Facebook from one of your best friends. She is saying that their house got broken into last night. You might take that seriously, right? There are countless well-known, viral stories that refer to burglars that got caught thanks to the help that came online, from people who identified the culprits.

However, the Recognize Thieves Scam is a phishing attack coming from an account that criminals had the chance to hack into. Then they send individual messages to all the people listed on the Friends list, saying they have been robbed but fortunately they have the burglary recorded on the security cameras.

"We have pictures of the thieves on the security cameras. Do you recognize any of them?", asks your 'friend' as she provides a link (a Tumbler link in this particular case, as you see in the image above).

The link opens a fake Facebook page that looks very realistic, where you have to put in your credentials in order to log in and access the content. As you might have the impression that you got logged out from Facebook, you might try to reconnect again by giving the scammers your email and Facebook password.

 

Alternatively, instead of a fake Facebook login page, you might be required to upgrade your Flash player to see the video that your 'friend' sent over. Many people fall for this one as well, as they think their software got obsolete. Little do they know that they are about to install malware on their device.

Be very careful about guarding your passwords and social media credentials, because nowadays it's easier than ever to get your accounts hacked into. How else do criminals get access to your profiles?

Watch the video below to see how scammers hack into your other accounts very easy:

How Scammers Hack Into Your Accounts Video

 

Recognize the Thieves Scam: How To Avoid

As this phishing scam does its rounds as you are reading this article, do not open the link. Just call your friend informing that their account got hacked. Never provide your personal information via social media hooks. Especially if they come from Tumblr.

If the promised pictures/videos send you to a domain name that doesn't even come close to a reputable website, you can rest assured you are a targeted victim of an attack.


identity theft protection

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