Holiday E-cards

How the scam works:

During the holiday season, we send and receive messages with all kinds of wishes– so you are not surprised when, one day, you receive an electronic card in your e-mail or your Facebook/ Twitter/ LinkedIn inboxes.

You get the notification and are invited to open the card by clicking on a link. The name of the e-card company that scammers use to get your attention could be a famous one (eg. Hallmark) but the link you are directed to click on contains a virus or key logger – software that records what keys you press and then access your personal files.

How to avoid:

Any reputable e-card company will tell you in the notification message who the person sending you the card. If the message you receive is just: “You’ve received a card” or "You have a secret admirer", delete it right away – especially if asks you to click on a links. Last but not least, look for the domain name used to send this message and also at the "Sent to" e-mail address. If it's not yours, ignore the e-mail.

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Gary

A lot of scams work like this. You might get what appears to be a letter from the IRS, an insurance company, a delivery service, and so on. The scammer claims they have an important document for you to review, and you need to open an attachment to view it. Don’t do it. It works exactly the same way the phony e-card does. The general rule is, don’t open attachments unless you know exactly what they are.

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